CHIRPING FROGS
(Syrrhophus sp.)

There are two species of chirping frogs within the range of this work.
These secretive little frogs are more often heard than seen. They are most likely to be seen after rains, more likely on the rocks than on the road.
WARNING
The chiping frogs are very succeptible to toxicity and acidity from other sources. I put one into a container with a green toad (B., debilis) and it was dead in less than thirty minutes. Another time I put some into containers with damp sphagnum moss, and they died withing a few hours. It is best to put them on damp paper towels in the containers. In captivity, they can be kept on small gravel with some water in the bottom. They must have a moist environment or, like many frogs, they will dry up in a short time.
CLIFF CHIRPING FROGS
(Syrrhophus marnocki)
The cliff chirping frog is found in Val Verde and Terrell Counties within the range of this work. By the rest area south of Loma Alta in Val Verde County, it is not unusual to hear them chriping, but they are difficult to find. Because of their size and coloring, they are difficult to see from more than a few feet away. This one is about 3/4 " long.

SPOTTED CHIRPING FROGS
(Syrrhophus guttilatus)
The spotted chirping frogs are found in small localized localities in the Big Bend. The only ones that I have found for certain have been in the Christmas Mountains. During a heavy rainstorm in 1991, I found four Syrrhophus in Jeff Davis County. As far as I know, they are considered to be spotted chirping frogs. These were the first specimens found in the Davis Mountains, although they had been suspected as being there from their calls.
****NOTE: S. guttilatus are currently protected in Texas.
This spotted chirping frog was the first one collected from Jeff Davis County. One night when I was living in Alpine we had a fierce storm and the electricity went out for an extended period. Unable to read, watch TV or use the computer, I went hunting. About 2:30 AM I found my first one. A few minutes later I found another pair, in amplexus (mating.) I was unable to sleep and went back out about 5 AM and found a fourth one.
I apologize for the poor picture, but I was a student at the time and had a crap camera.